Our Track Record

Over the last 40 years Tonkin + Taylor have developed leading practice in climate risk and adaptation planning for both throughout New Zealand and the Pacific across individual organisations to local and national government.

New Zealand

Within New Zealand, our recent work includes the National Climate Change Risk Assessment, a range of assessments for regional and local councils, design of the national Risk Assessment Framework and membership of the government’s Climate Adaptation Technical Working Group. We have recently provided technical advice to Local Government New Zealand on exposure assessments and climate risk (recently published) and are working with a range of infrastructure providers to undertake hazard mapping and risk assessments.

With the passing of the Zero carbon act, the associated reporting powers, and an increased focus on disclosure frameworks such as the Task Force on Climate Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD), organisations which address climate change early will no doubt have a smoother transition, than those than delay action.

As a result, a new focus has been placed on the need to manage the risks of climate change (adaptation), and reduce carbon emissions (mitigation). This has already begun to occur at national, regional and local levels with Tonkin + Taylor assisting a number of central and local government agencies to carry out climate change risk assessments across the four wellbeing’s, as well as to advise on carbon reduction strategies.

Pacific

Throughout the Pacific Tonkin + Taylor have been involved in disaster risk and climate vulnerability studies for countries such as Vanuatu, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Kiribati and many more. These studies have assisted donor and aid agencies such as the Asian Development Bank, World Bank, United Nations Development Programme alike to assess vulnerabilities to climate change at both individual infrastructure scales as well as at a national scale to identify areas at higher risk of being impacted by climate change.